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Lifestyle & Diet Tips for Better Sleep

20 May Better Sleep

Article By: Sara Siskind

Besides creating a comfortable, peaceful bedroom, there are many ways to help induce sleep, starting with diet and daily habits. Preparing for a good night’s sleep should begin at mealtime, especially as it gets closer to bedtime.

There are several foods that help create a calming effect on the brain and body. Here are some practical and easy tips for a restful night.

Rituals to Help Sleep Better
Creating a smarter nighttime routine is one secret to waking up well-rested. What I do in the evening impacts how I sleep.

Exercise at The Right Time
Among its many benefits, such as weight management, stress reduction, and disease prevention, exercise is important to sleep. Without daily exercise, I find myself out of balance.

Even what time I exercise has an impact.

When I exercise in the morning or early afternoon, it helps me fall asleep quicker.
When I exercise within an hour of my bedtime, my body becomes overstimulated, which can lead to insomnia.
I rest more soundly if I stick to a morning routine.

Be Consistent
Try to get up at the same time, whether it’s a weekday, weekend, or vacation. Our body’s internal clock (the circadian rhythm) becomes stabilized with consistent wake-up times. Give it a try for a least 21 days, and you’ll start feeling more rested.

Avoid Electronics and Screentime
I power off my electronics, especially my phone, at least an hour before I want to go to sleep. This helps calm my mind and reduces the strain on my eyes from staring at the screen.

Set the Right Temperature
Next, I make sure the temperature is just right. For me, the perfect temperature is somewhere between 60 and 68 degrees, so my body is neither hot nor cold.

Foods for Better Sleep
Certain foods may help induce sleep. Many of them increase the hormone melatonin that our bodies produce. Some people produce less melatonin than others, so I find it helpful to include these foods in my evening meal or snack.

Tart Cherry Juice
A morning and evening ritual of drinking tart cherry juice has helped me sleep better. Researchers from Louisiana State University found that drinking the juice of Montmorency tart cherries twice a day for two weeks helped increase sleep time by nearly 90 minutes among older adults with insomnia.

Pistachio Nuts
Besides being a powerhouse of heart-healthy fats, protein, and fiber, pistachios also contain a significant amount of vitamin B6, which can help induce sleepiness. According to the Alaska Sleep Clinic, a deficiency in B6 has been linked with lowered serotonin levels and poor sleep. Deficiencies in B6 show symptoms of depression and mood disorders, which can also lead to insomnia. I choose high-quality pistachios like Setton Farms Pistachios sold in convenient 100-calorie packs so you don’t overeat them.

Bananas
Bananas contain magnesium and potassium, which are natural muscle relaxers.

Chamomile Tea
Chamomile is a soothing herbal tea that naturally lacks caffeine. Having a hot cup before bed sets my body into relaxation mode.

Kiwis
These fruits contain a significant amount of serotonin. Researchers found eating kiwi daily improved both the quality and quantity of sleep.

No Caffeine After 2
Avoid coffee, tea, and sodas in the afternoon. These drinks can cause restlessness at night. I also avoid foods that contain hidden caffeine, including chocolate, protein bars, vitamin waters, and even decaf coffee. I don’t drink lots of fluids, even water, in the evening as it tends to wake me up at night and disrupts my sleep.

Benefits of Sea Moss The Aquatic Superfood on The Rise

20 May Sea Moss

Article by: Nan Fornal

Sea moss is surging in popularity, but is it for you?

What is Sea Moss?
Whether you call it by its Latin name, Chondrus crispus, or by one of its common names, sea moss or Irish moss, this type of red algae is surging in popularity.

Nutritional Benefits of Sea Moss
What Nutrients Are in Sea Moss?
Besides being loaded with fiber, which is good for digestion, sea moss contains vitamins, including antioxidants, trace elements, and minerals.

Why is Sea Moss So Good for You?
“Important minerals, such as calcium, accumulate in seaweeds at much higher levels than in terrestrial foodstuffs,” according to researchers led by Paul MacArtain, PhD.

Has Sea Moss Been Tested?
There have not been many human trials on sea moss, even on the bioavailability of its nutrients.

How to Use Sea Moss
Sea moss powder, available from natural products retailers, is easy to sprinkle into smoothies and oatmeal and to add as a thickener to sauces and desserts.

Precautions
Iodine
Like many seaweeds, sea moss is rich in iodine, which is critical for thyroid function.

“The goal with iodine,” says nutritionist Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD, “is to consume a just-right amount, as both too little and too much can throw thyroid hormones out of whack.” Sass suggests using sea moss in moderation, adding it to smoothies from time to time, for example, rather than overdoing it.

Maternity
Check with your healthcare provider before adding sea moss to your diet, especially during pregnancy and nursing.

What do I do if I Think I was Exposed to Coronavirus?

Mar Florida Health 1

Some people are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19. Here’s what to do if you think you may have been exposed to coronavirus.

Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed COVID-19 cases. These symptoms may appear 2–14 days after exposure.

Fever (100.4°F/38°C or higher)
Cough
Shortness of breath

If you develop these emergency warning signs for COVID-19, get medical attention immediately.
Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
New confusion or inability to arouse
Bluish lips or face

Call before you go
Call your doctor or your County Health Department if you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing.
Tell them about your symptoms and your exposure. They will decide whether you need to be tested.
Consult your health care provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.