Out2News Traffic & Travel

Best & Worst Times to Travel This Thanksgiving

Cars on Freeway

Article by: I-95 Exit Guide
Thanksgiving is just around the corner and this year’s I-95 traffic may prove to be a record breaker.

Traveling I-95 can be a real pain with heavy traffic and plenty of short tempers. Here are a few tips to help make your Thanksgiving holiday voyage less stressful:
Getting There:

The absolute worst time to get on the road is the day before Thanksgiving (Wednesday, November 27) and if you leave in mid-afternoon (3:00 p.m.) you definitely won’t be a happy camper once you get there.
If you have no choice but to leave on Wednesday, make it as early as possible. Start you trip no later than 6:00 a.m. to avoid traffic delays.
The Sunday before Thanksgiving (November 24) is the best day to leave for your Thanksgiving road trip, the earlier, the better.
Thanksgiving morning is also a good time to leave, the earlier, the better.

Returning Home:

The day after Thanksgiving (Friday, November 29) before 6:00 a.m. is the best day and time to return from your Thanksgiving trip.
Saturday and Sunday (November 30 and December 1) late afternoon are the worst days and times to return from your Thanksgiving road trip. Avoid being on the road between 11:00 a.m and 6:00 p.m. Traffic will be heavy during those times.
If you have no choice but to leave on Saturday, try leaving as early as possible (before 6 a.m.) to avoid traffic delays.

Depending on where you’re heading, and how long the trip will be, you might be able to schedule the time when you are on the road to at avoid the worst of it.

Adjust your schedule or route and consider these options:

Take a bypass route around large cities
Tune to a radio station and monitor the traffic reports
If you have mobile access, Use live-traffic-reports.com to monitor traffic
Stop at a rest area if headed into heavy traffic and wait until the worst of it has subsided
Avoid shopping districts (Black Friday is usually gridlocked around major shopping areas)

Drive responsibly and have a safe trip!

For more I-95 travel information, visit www.i95exitguide.com, the Internet’s largest and most complete website devoted to I-95, America’s Interstate Main Street. Detailed exit service listings… discount lodging, camping, food, gas and more for every exit from Maine to Florida! Plus I-95 construction, real-time traffic and road news.

A Real ID is a Form of Identification

As interesting as this may seem, so many people are still not aware of a deadline on the horizon for what is known as “Real ID”.  A Real ID is a form of Identification that meets increased security standards for state-issued driver’s licenses and identification cards. Travelers will be required to provide either a Real ID or another TSA approved form of Identification in order to fly after October 1, 2020.

The following is a recent article from the NY Times detailing what you need to know about the importance of the Real ID, and how to obtain them.

By Tariro Mzezewa

Oct. 2, 2019

Americans are not ready for the Real ID Act that goes into full effect a year from now, according to a survey released last week by the nonprofit trade group U.S. Travel Association.

The Real ID Act was passed by Congress in 2005 to increase security measures concerning state-issued personal identification cards, mainly driver’s licenses, that are often used to access airports and military bases and nuclear installations. Beginning Oct. 1, 2020, only Real ID-compliant documentation will be accepted for boarding commercial flights, including domestic flights, and entering federal buildings and military bases.

Compliant documentation includes passports (which are still required for international flights), passport cards and trusted traveler identification like Global Entry. But a majority of Americans turn to their driver’s licenses to pass through security for their domestic air travel, and only 42 percent of Americans hold passports.

Some 99 million Americans do not have the Real ID-compliant identification, the U.S. Travel Association said.

 Once the October deadline is passed, travelers will be turned away from airports when they cannot provide the approved identification at security checkpoints, potentially causing confusion and chaos.

“If Real ID went into effect tomorrow, almost 80,000 people trying to board a plane would be denied on Day 1,” the U.S. Travel Association said in a statement.

“This is significant not only because it will inconvenience travelers and create confusion at U.S. airports. It could do significant damage to our nation’s economy,” said Roger Dow, the president and chief executive of the U.S. Travel Association.

Many states, which oversee the task of issuing and processing driver’s licenses and many other forms of documents used to prove identification, were slow to adopt. Some have experienced delays, miscommunication with the federal government and technical glitches in their effort to issue Real IDs​ to residents​.

The Department of Homeland Security, tasked with implementing the Real ID Act, reminded Americans to get their Real IDs and acknowledged that significant progress has been made in issuing the IDs in less than two years​. Forty-seven states are currently issuing the IDs, up from 26 in January ​2017.

To receive a Real ID-compliant license, the Department of Homeland Security requires people to provide documentation showing their full legal name, date of birth, Social Security number, two proofs of address of principal residence and lawful status. Licenses are still processed by the state; some states may require more information.

​Travelers also have the option of getting an Enhanced ID, ​which is Real ID-compliant and can be used for domestic travel, as well as for traveling from Canada, Mexico and some Caribbean countries by sea or land, but not on flights. Enhanced IDs are only available to American citizens, while anyone with lawful​​ presence in the United States can get a Real ID​. ​​

Most Real ID licenses display a star in the top right corner, and Enhanced ID license have the word “Enhanced” printed across the top span.

The U.S. Travel Association is urging Americans to check their Real ID status at their state’s motor vehicle department. The organization is also asking states to encourage residents to upgrade their license sooner than later.

For more information visit the Department of Homeland Security website at www.dhs.gov.

FDOT Treasure Coast Traffic Report November 15 through November 22, 2019

Martin, St. Lucie & Indian River Counties, FL – Construction, maintenance and permit-related lane closures on state highways in Martin, St. Lucie and Indian River counties are expected during November 15 through November 22, 2019. Weather permitting, work will be done at the following locations throughout the Treasure Coast.
For updated lane closure information, please refer to www.d4fdot.com. Follow us on Twitter @ MyFDOT_SEFL.
Please note, any full road, ramp or bridge closures have been highlighted below.

CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS MARTIN COUNTY
1. State Road 710 / Warfield Boulevard from East of Kanner Highway (State Road 76) to the Martin / Palm Beach County Line
Description: This 5.572-mile project includes reconstructing State Road 710 to a 4-lane divided roadway with a 40-foot sodded median, concrete pavement, installing a new drainage system, and constructing a new wildlife crossing west of Martin / Palm Beach County line.
Cost/Completion: $27.99 million. Completion is expected in spring 2020.
Traffic Impact:
• One lane in either direction of SR 710 may be intermittently closed Monday through Saturday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. for roadway work. Two-way traffic will be maintained by a flag crew. For more information, please contact Community Outreach Specialist Kathleen Dempsey at 772-359-5118.

2. Kanner Highway / State Road 76 from south of Pratt Whitney Road (County Road 711) to SW Jack James Drive
Description: Kanner Highway is being widened from south of Pratt Whitney Road to SW Jack James Drive. Work on this 1.94-mile project includes: reconstructing Kanner Highway from CR 711 to Locks Road from a two-lane undivided highway to a four-lane divided highway with a raised median and curb & gutter; adding seven-foot-wide bicycle lanes from CR 711 to Locks Road; adding a 12-foot-wide shared use path on the east side of Kanner Highway from CR 711 to Locks Road; adding a six-foot-wide sidewalk on the west side of Kanner Highway from CR 711 to Locks Road; installing drainage features that will improve drainage; and resurfacing Kanner Highway from Locks Road to SW Jack James Drive. Access points and turn lanes will be provided throughout the corridor at the following locations: there will be turn lanes at the two signalized intersections CR 711 and Locks Road; full median openings will be at Mary Drive, Tropical Avenue, and SW Old Royal Drive; and a left-turn-only median opening will be located at Beverly Terrace.
Cost/Completion: $12,892,088.57. Completion is expected in summer 2021.
Traffic Impact:
• The speed limit on Kanner Highway from south of Pratt Whitney Road to SW Jack James Drive has been temporarily reduced from 50 MPH to 45 MPH. This speed limit reduction will be in place through the end of the project.
• One lane in either direction of Kanner Highway from Pratt Whitney Road to SW Jack James Drive will be closed intermittently Monday through Saturday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. for earthwork, paving, and drainage operations. For lane closures on Kanner Highway where there is only one existing lane in each direction, two-way traffic will be maintained by a flag crew.
• One lane in either direction of Pratt Whitney Road at the Kanner Highway intersection will be closed intermittently Monday through Saturday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. for earthwork, paving, and drainage operations. Two-way traffic will be maintained by a flag crew. For more information, please contact Community Outreach Specialist Kathleen Dempsey at 772-359-5118.
3. I-95 Lighting and Roadway Improvements Project
Description: The I-95 lighting and roadway improvements project runs from south of the Martin County rest area to south of State Road 714/Martin Highway. Work on this 5-mile project includes: installing lighting along I-95; lengthening the I-95 entrance ramp auxiliary lane from the Martin County northbound rest area; milling & resurfacing along northbound I-95 at the Martin County northbound rest area to tie into the reconstructed auxiliary lane; and milling & resurfacing of the existing pavement and placing overbuild along southbound I-95 where needed for cross slope corrections.
Cost/Completion: $5,985,000. Completion is expected in summer 2020.
Traffic Impact:
• Two southbound lanes of I-95 will be closed Sunday through Thursday night from 7 p.m. to 5 a.m. for paving.
• Intermittent shoulder closures along I-95 will occur in both directions Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. to install highway lighting.
• Up to two northbound lanes of I-95 approximately three miles north of High Meadow Avenue / Exit 102 at the Martin County rest area may be closed Sunday through Thursday night from 7 p.m. to 5 a.m. for roadway construction. For more information, please contact Community Outreach Specialist Kathleen Dempsey at 772-359-5118.

4. Jensen Beach Boulevard Shoulder Widening and Resurfacing Project, from U.S. 1 to Savannah Road
Description: Jensen Beach Boulevard/State Road 732 is being resurfaced and the shoulder is being widened from U.S. 1 to Savannah Road/County Road 723. The improvements include: milling and resurfacing the existing roadway; widening and restriping pavement to provide dedicated bike lanes; upgrading current drainage; installing new guardrail at NE Pinecrest Lakes Boulevard; improving sidewalks to provide American with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliant curb ramps; improving signing and pavement markings; replacing the existing span wire signal system at US 1 with a mast arm signal system; upgrading pedestrian signals at signalized intersections; and providing intersection lighting at the SR 732 and US 1 intersection and enhancing lighting at other signalized intersections.
Cost/Completion: $5,272,134. Completion is expected in summer 2020.
Traffic Impact:
• One lane in each direction of Jensen Beach Boulevard will be intermittently closed Sunday through Thursday night from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. through Nov. 2019 for roadway shoulder widening.
• One lane in each direction of Jensen Beach Boulevard will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Nov. 2019 for roadway work.
• Single lane closures will occur at the U.S. 1 and Jensen Beach Boulevard intersection Monday through Friday from 3 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Nov. 22 for drilled shaft installation.
• The sidewalk along the south side of Jensen Beach Boulevard from U.S. 1 to Savannah Road is closed through fall 2019. Pedestrians should utilize the sidewalk on the north side of Jensen Beach Boulevard, crossing at signalized intersections.
• Traffic on Jensen Beach Boulevard is shifted to the inside median through fall 2019 to facilitate outside widening, lighting, sidewalk, signal, and drainage work. For more information, please contact Community Outreach Specialist Kathleen Dempsey at 772-359-5118.

5. U.S. 1 Shoulder Widening and Resurfacing Project, from South of SE Heritage Boulevard to North of SE Salerno Road
Description: U.S. 1 is undergoing a shoulder widening and resurfacing project from south of SE Heritage Boulevard to north of SE Salerno Road. The improvements include: milling and resurfacing of all travel lanes, turn lanes, and shoulders; widening the shoulders to accommodate 7-foot buffered bicycle lanes; addressing pavement failures at Cove Road and Salerno Road; upgrading sidewalk and pedestrian ramps to meet American with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards; upgrading signing and pavement markings; installing new pedestrian countdown signal heads at multiple signalized intersections; upgrading traffic controller cabinets at all signalized intersections; and installing lighting improvements at Salerno Road and Cove Road intersections.
Cost/Completion: $8,446,060. Completion is expected in spring 2021.
Traffic Impact:
• One lane in each direction of U.S. 1 will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for shoulder widening.
• Intermittent lane closures will occur at the U.S. 1/Salerno Road and U.S. 1/Cove Road intersections Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for pipe cleaning. During this time, turning lanes may be closed but traffic will still be able to make turns utilizing the through travel lane.
• Intermittent sidewalk closures will occur on the east side of U.S. 1 Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Pedestrians should cross at the nearest signalized intersection and follow the detour signage in place. For more information, please contact Community Outreach Specialist Kathleen Dempsey at 772-359-5118.

6. U.S. 1 from Britt Road to Jensen Beach Boulevard in Stuart
Traffic Impact:
• One northbound lane of U.S. 1 will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for utility work.
• Two northbound lanes of U.S. 1 will be closed Monday night from 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. for utility work. For more information, please contact Steve Jungjohan at 772-882-5084.

7. U.S. 1 from Wright Boulevard to Jack Williams Way in Stuart and Jensen Beach
Traffic Impact:
• One northbound lane of U.S. 1 will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Dec. 13 for utility work. For more information, please contact Max Werling at 321-723-6025.

8. U.S. 1 from Jensen Beach Boulevard to just South of Lennard Road in Jensen Beach
Traffic Impact:
• One southbound lane of U.S. 1 will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for utility work. For more information, please contact Steve Jungjohan at 772-882-5084.

9. U.S. 1 just South of Jensen Beach Boulevard in Jensen Beach
Traffic Impact:
• One northbound lane of U.S. 1 will be closed Thursday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. for utility work. For more information, please contact Russell Getgood at 561-389-3711.

ST. LUCIE COUNTY

10. Midway Road Widening Project, from S. 25th Street to U.S. 1
Description: This 1.8-mile project includes: reconstructing the existing two-lane Midway Road to a four-lane, divided highway with a raised median; installing a new signal at Sunrise Boulevard; constructing a new bridge over the North Fork St. Lucie River; constructing a 6-foot sidewalk on the north side and a 12-foot multi-purpose trail on the south side Midway Road; constructing 4-foot bike lanes on both sides of the roadway; reconstruction of S. 25th Street approximately 1000’ to the south & north of Midway Road; reconstruction of Sunrise Boulevard from W. 1st Street to Charlotta Street; reconstruction of Oleander Avenue from W. 2nd Street to Merritt’s Ditch; drainage improvements, including constructing 6 retention ponds at 5 locations; and signage, signalization, and lighting improvements.
Cost/Completion: $26.85 million. Completion is expected in fall 2020.
Traffic Impact:
• One lane in either direction of Midway Road between 25th Street and U.S. 1 may be closed Monday through Friday except from 6:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. & 4 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. for drainage activities, signalization, bridge work, and embankment/excavation. Two-way traffic will be maintained with a flag crew.
• One lane in either direction of Oleander Avenue between West 1st Street and just north of Midway Road by Merritt’s Ditch may be closed Monday through Friday except from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. & 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. for drainage activities and signalization. Two-way traffic will be maintained with a flag crew.
• One lane in either direction of Sunrise Boulevard between West 1st Street and Augusta Street may be closed Monday through Friday except from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. & 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. for drainage activities, embankment, and signalization. Two-way traffic will be maintained with a flag crew.
• One lane in each direction of 25th St. from 1,200’ north to 500’ south of Midway Road may have daytime and nighttime lane closures Monday through Friday except for between the hours of 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. for drainage work and paving.
• One lane in either direction of Melville Road just south of Midway Road may be closed Monday through Friday except from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. & 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. for drainage. A flag crew will maintain two-way traffic.
• One lane in either direction of U.S. 1 at Midway Road may be closed Monday through Friday except from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. & 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. for signalization and lighting.
• Eastbound and westbound traffic on Midway Road from 25th Street to Oleander Avenue is shifted to the north on the newly constructed roadway to facilitate roadway construction to the south.
• Northbound and southbound traffic on Oleander Avenue from 2nd Street to Merritt’s Ditch is shifted to the west on the newly constructed roadway to facilitate roadway construction to the east.
• Northbound and southbound traffic on Sunrise Boulevard from 2nd Street to Charlotta Street is shifted to the west on the newly constructed roadway to facilitate roadway construction to the east.
• Northbound and southbound traffic on 25th Street from Canoe Creek Lane to approximately 1,000 feet north of Midway Road is shifted to the east to facilitate roadway construction to the west.
11. Peter P. Cobb Bridge (SR A1A) Rehabilitation and Observation Walk Replacement Project
Description: The Peter P. Cobb Bridge rehabilitation and observation walk replacement project over the Intracoastal Waterway in the City of Ft. Pierce includes: replacing the existing observation walkways, installing scour countermeasures along the channel bottom under the bridge, and making repairs to deteriorated concrete on the bridge pier columns.
Cost/Completion: $9.9 million. Completion is expected in spring 2020.
Traffic Impact:
• The northwest catwalk is closed for demolition & reconstruction through the end of the project, spring 2020. During this time, the catwalk will not be accessible to the public.
• The sidewalk that runs under the west side of Peter P. Cobb Bridge is closed for repair work. Pedestrians should cross SR A1A / Seaway Drive at Indian River Drive.
• The southeast catwalk is closed for demolition & reconstruction through the end of the project, spring 2020. During this time, the catwalk will not be accessible to the public. For more information, please contact Community Outreach Specialist Kathleen Dempsey at 772-359-5118.

12. Kings Highway Widening Project, from South of State Road 70 to North of the I-95 Overpass
Description: Kings Highway / State Road 713 is being widened from south of State Road 70 to north of the I-95 overpass in the City of Ft. Pierce and unincorporated St. Lucie County. The improvements on this 3.417-mile project include: reconstructing the existing two-lane undivided Kings Highway with a newly constructed four‐lane divided roadway, relocating Canal No. 40 and Canal No. 32E to accommodate widening to the west, realigning Kings Highway at the intersection with Okeechobee Road which will improve the existing connection with the Turnpike, replacing existing culverts/swales and installing a closed drainage system and retention ponds, installing a new highway lighting system, and upgrading signalization with vehicle detection devices and ITS cameras. Features of the new roadway will include: a 30‐foot wide median with Type E Curb and Gutter (22‐foot-wide raised plus two four‐foot-wide paved inside shoulders), 6.5‐foot-wide outside shoulders which will also serve as buffered bicycle lanes, a 12‐foot-wide shared use path along the west side, and a 6‐foot-wide sidewalk along the east side.
Cost/Completion: $45,221,785.65. Completion is expected in fall 2022.
Traffic Impact:
• The speed limit on Kings Highway from south of Okeechobee Road / State Road 70 to north of the I-95 overpass has been temporarily reduced from 50 MPH to 40 MPH. This speed limit reduction will be in place through the end of the project.
• One lane in either direction of Kings Highway may be intermittently closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through fall 2022 for roadway work. Two-way traffic will be maintained by a flag crew. During this time, intermittent side street closures may occur, maintaining two-way traffic at all times.
• Full Closure: Crossroads Parkway just east of Kings Highway is closed for reconstruction of Crossroads Parkway. This full closure is anticipated to be in place through April 2020, weather permitting. During this time, motorists heading north on Kings Highway should detour via Graham Road to South Jenkins Road to Okeechobee Road. Motorists heading southbound on Kings Highway should detour via Okeechobee Road. For more information, please contact Community Outreach Specialist Kathleen Dempsey at 772-359-5118.

13. U.S. 1 from Veterans Memorial Parkway to Savanna Club Boulevard in Port St. Lucie
Traffic Impact:
• One southbound U.S. 1 to eastbound Village Green Drive left turn lane will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Dec. 31 for construction activities.
• One lane in each direction of U.S. 1 from Savanna Club Boulevard to Veterans Memorial Parkway will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Dec. 31 for construction activities.
• Two lanes in each direction of U.S. 1 from Savanna Club Boulevard to Walton Road will be closed Sunday through Thursday night from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. through Dec. 31. For more information, please contact Community Outreach Specialist Beth Zsoka at 772-834-1298.

14. U.S. 1 from Westmoreland Boulevard to Jennings Road in Port St. Lucie
Traffic Impact:
• One southbound lane of U.S. 1 will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for utility work. For more information, please contact Steve Jungjohan at 772-882-5084.

15. U.S. 1 at Prima Vista Boulevard in Port St. Lucie
Traffic Impact:
• One northbound U.S. 1 to westbound Prima Vista Boulevard left turn lane will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for drainage work. For more information, please contact Mark D'Annunzio at 772-288-0951.

16. Okeechobee Road at Gentile Road in Ft. Pierce
Traffic Impact:
• One eastbound lane of Okeechobee Road will be closed Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Nov. 19 for paving. For more information, please contact Thomas Terpening, Jr. at 772-464-3537.

17. Okeechobee Road at McNeil Road in Ft. Pierce
Traffic Impact:
• Two westbound lanes of Okeechobee Road will be closed Thursday night from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. for paving. For more information, please contact Marcus Jackson at 772-519-2355.

18. I-95 from Indrio Road (Exit 138) to Orange Avenue (Exit 131) in Ft. Pierce
Traffic Impact:
• Advance Notice: One southbound lane of I-95 will be closed Sunday night, Dec. 8 and Monday night, Dec. 9 from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. for paving. For more information, please contact Brittaney Bradley at 772-252-5992.

19. Orange Avenue at I-95 in Ft. Pierce
Traffic Impact:
• Advance Notice: One eastbound turn lane of Orange Avenue to northbound I-95 will be closed Monday night, Dec. 9 and Tuesday night, Dec. 10 from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. for paving. For more information, please contact Brittaney Bradley at 772-252-5992.

Out2News November Destination Maui

The island of Maui is the second-largest of the Hawaiian Islands at 727.2 square miles (1,883 km2) and is the 17th largest island in the United States. Maui is part of the State of Hawaii and is the largest of Maui County's four islands, which include Molokaʻi, Lānaʻi, and unpopulated Kahoʻolawe. In 2010, Maui had a population of 144,444, third-highest of the Hawaiian Islands, behind that of Oʻahu and Hawaiʻi Island. Kahului is the largest census-designated place (CDP) on the island with a population of 26,337 as of 2010 and is the commercial and financial hub of the island. Wailuku is the seat of Maui County and is the third-largest CDP as of 2010. Other significant places include Kīhei (including Wailea and Makena in the Kihei Town CDP, the island's second-most-populated CDP), Lahaina (including Kāʻanapali and Kapalua in the Lahaina Town CDP), Makawao, Pukalani, Pāʻia, Kula, Haʻikū, and Hāna.

Polynesians from Tahiti were the original people to populate Maui. The Tahitians introduced the kapu system, a strict social order that affected all aspects of life and became the core of Hawaiʻian culture. Modern Hawaiʻian history began in the mid-18th century. Kamehameha I, king of the island of Hawaiʻi, invaded Maui in 1790 and fought the inconclusive Battle of Kepaniwai, but returned to Hawaiʻi to battle a rival, finally subduing Maui a few years later.

Maui's primary agriculture products are corn and other seeds, fruits, cattle and vegetables. Specific products include coffee, macadamia nuts, papaya, flowers and fresh pineapple. Historically, Maui's primary products were sugar and pineapple. Maui Land & Pineapple Company and Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Company (HC&S, a subsidiary of Alexander and Baldwin Company) dominated agricultural activity. In 2016, sugar production ended.Haliimaile Pineapple Co. grows pineapple on former Maui Land & Pineapple Co. land.

Maui's various attractions and activities cater to just about every interest. While adventurers hike the dormant Haleakala volcano or fly above it on a helicopter tour, more relaxed travelers can soak up the sun on one of many shorelines or test the fairways at one of the island's 14 golf courses. But Maui isn't just for beach bums and active types: The island offers up its own history and culture at sites like Iao Valley State Park, Banyan Tree Park and the Old Lahaina Luau. And those traveling with kids can learn all about Hawaii's underwater residents at the Maui Ocean Center.Sports in Maui are snorkeling, windsurfing, surfing, kiteboarding. The big tourist spots in Maui include the Haleakalā National Park, Iao Valley, and Lahaina.

Inventive Hotel Hacks for the Savvy Traveler

Article by: The Discoverer Blog
We can't deter chain hotels from serving sad scrambled eggs at continental breakfast or cap the amount of running kids around the fifth-floor hot tub, but we can alleviate some of the anguish. We know your king suite's not perfect. But a few weeks ago one Twitter user, Rick Klau, shared a genius hotel trick that spawned a brilliant thread of travelers sharing their best hotel tricks. Check out these eight inventive hotel hacks that won't stop trending on Twitter. You, savvy traveler, deserve only the best rest.

Keep the Curtains Closed With a Hanger

That tiny crack about a newspaper's width will make you wish you could gauge your eyes out at 3 a.m. when the cheap orange street lights are aglow beneath the same Chili's sign. @johnfein's solution is shutting the curtains with a hotel pen clip. Others chimed in sharing that binder clips, hair clips, safety pins, and clothespins do the trick too, if you can remember to bring them along. However, the two clips on the hanger in your closet will work too.

Best Fall Vacations

Charleston South Carolina Best Fall Vacation

Charleston 2
Charleston

Charleston, SC

Centuries-old mansions, Spanish moss-draped trees, spooky cemeteries, cobblestone walks: in a word, Charleston. As you walk the gas lamp-lit streets at night, past horse-drawn carriages and the antebellum architecture, you just might think you've traveled back in time. But just because this South Carolina city is proud to celebrate its heritage doesn't mean it's stuck in the past. Charleston boasts innovative restaurants, interesting shops, contemporary art galleries and the world-class Spoleto Festival USA. This is the place to experience the genteel South – after all, it was the home of suave "Gone with the Wind" character, Rhett Butler.

History pervades almost every aspect of the Holy City, from the majestic homes-turned-museums to the landmarks that promote the city's role in United States history. Civil War buffs should head to Fort Sumter, where the first shot of the War between the States was fired. Meanwhile, shopaholics looking for locally made goods should peruse the Charleston City Market. When you're ready for a day at the beach, the city's got you covered there, too. Several beach towns, including Sullivan's Island, Isle of Palm and Folly Beach, offer sun, sand and gentle waves.

Best Months to Visit

The best time to visit Charleston is from March to May or from September to November when temperatures are mild – but not stifling. Hotel rates, however, will be high, especially around Easter. Also, the city will be thick with crowds "ooh-ing" and "ahh-ing" at the blooming magnolia trees, the Southern fried food and their tour guide's ghost stories. Steer clear of high prices and tourist swarms by visiting in the late fall or early winter.

BLUE MARLIN COVE FISHING

19 Aug BLue marling fish

If you don’t own a boat but have always wanted to visit the Bahamas, our Captain-on-Call will whisk you away to Blue Marlin Cove on a 40-foot boat with top-of-the-line equipment. Captains Justin and Steve are experts in navigating our waters and finding the best spots for blue marlin, wahoo, and other catches.

Own your own boat? Don’t want to captain Grand Bahama’s waters yourself? Our Captain on Call is also on-hand for day sport-fishing trips.

BEST FISHING IN FLORIDA!

19 AUG jACKSONVILLE

Jacksonville is where you go to get Kingfish. The Mackerel grow massive here and make for a tasty meal. You don’t have to be a professional angler to catch them, but you could sure use help of a local guide to get the big ones.

Want to spend a relaxing day with your kids and avoid the choppy seas? Our advice is to stay inshore. There are plenty of fisheries near the coastline where you can get Redfish, Spotted Seatrout, Flounder, and Sheepshead. Backwater fishing here is legendary. You can get all the excitement within walking distance of downtown Jacksonville.

If you want to make a day of it, head offshore to snatch some Sailfish, Wahoo, Mahi Mahi, and Tuna. These deep sea trips can end with an impressive catch. You don’t need to have the gear, nor the moves, as local charter captains will put you on fish in no time.

19 Aug Off the Water

When you’re not fishing: There’s a lot to do here besides fishing. Downtown Jacksonville is filled with shops and coffee houses. Make sure to visit Hemming Park where you can rest and savor the view. And if you like photography, the skyline will provide the perfect setting for your photos. Also, you should definitely visit the Riverwalk and enjoy the sunset.

19 Aug Random Travel Tips